Skip to main content

Table 1 Review of previous `motion dazzle’ studies

From: Motion dazzle and the effects of target patterning on capture success

Paper Methodology Conclusions
Stevens et al. (2008) [17] Human `prey capture’ experiments using a computer game. Self paced responses, unpredictable trajectory. Targets with highly conspicuous stripe/zigzag patterns & uniformly camouflaged (grey) targets similarly difficult to catch and caught less than some other pattern types.
Zylinski et al. (2009) [20] Tested whether cuttlefish were more likely to use low or high contrast (`dazzle’) patterns when in motion. Cuttlefish reduced the amount of high contrast patterns they displayed when in motion.
Scott-Samuel et al. (2011) [18] Humans asked to judge which of two patterns appeared to be moving more quickly. Predictable trajectory. Targets with zigazag/check patterns perceived to be moving more slowly than unpatterned (white Gaussian) targets. No effect for striped patterns.
Stevens et al. (2011) [21] Human `prey capture’ experiments using a touch screen computer game. Self paced responses, unpredictable trajectory. Striped moving targets caught less often than camouflaged (background matching) targets (despite being caught more often when stationary).
Santer (2013) [34] Tested response of locust neurons involved in escape responses to motion dazzle stimuli. High contrast motion dazzle stimuli caused a weaker response in these neurons than uniformly dark stimuli. However, uniformly bright stimuli produce an even weaker response.
Von Helversen et al. (2013) [19] Humans asked to attempt to capture moving target using a joystick. Target moving on predictable trajectory and disappeared before capture attempt made. Also made perceptual judgements about which of two patterns appeared to be moving more quickly. Striped targets no more difficult or easier than uniform black targets to capture. Striped targets perceived as moving faster than uniform black targets.
How & Zanker (2014)[16] Modelling potential motion detection mechanism in human vision and the motion signals that zebras would produce in this model. Stripes on zebras produce more erroneous information about direction of movement than unpatterned horses.